Pupil Premium

 

Caton St Paul’s Church of England Primary School, in common with all other local schools, receives its funding from the Government via Lancashire Local Authority.

One element of this funding is called the PUPIL PREMIUM. The amount of this additional funding varies from school to school and is dependent on 3 factors: the number of children in school who are in the care of the local authority, the number who have an entitlement to a free school meal (for a minimum of 1 day during the previous 6 years – this does not include infants on universal free school meals, although parents of these children can still apply for free school meals) and the number who have a parent serving in the armed forces.

Our strategy is to ensure that all children make good or better progress – including those whose family circumstances generate Pupil Premium income for the school. Nationally, there is an “attainment gap” when children from differing socio-economic backgrounds are compared – our goal is to do what we can here at Caton St Paul’s to bridge that gap where it exists.

The main barriers to educational achievement faced by some children at this school are around access to enriching activities, familial stress and, in a very few cases, attendance and lateness.

The progress of children from different ‘groups’ is carefully tracked, provision is made for a flexible arrangement of support and class teachers identify/review the specific needs of children. Mrs Longhorn, our Learning Mentor, works closely with specific children to ensure their mental health and wellbeing enables them to successfully access the curriculum.

The impact of Pupil Premium funding is reviewed at the end of each academic year. You can see a breakdown of attainment for Pupil Premium children in the year 2019-20 by clicking the link to the funding review below.
The Pupil Premium statement details how we spent our PPG (Pupil Premium Grant) last year and how we have targeted it this year. Please be aware that the PPG is paid into school budgets in January, so doesn’t follow the usual academic year.